Home

Legal Categories

Attorneys

Business Law

Class Action Lawsuits

Civil Rights

Consumer Protection Law

Construction Law

Criminal Law

Drunk Driving

Drug Trafficking

Education Law

Elder Law

Identity Theft

Immigration Law

Intellectual Property

Labor Law

Lemon Law

Lawsuits

Negligence Law

Product Recall

Sexual Harassment

Stalking

Statue of Limitations

Taxes & the IRS

Wills

Arbitration

Legal Aid

Alimony Law

Share |

Alimony generally refers to a monthly payments that are made to the former female spouse after divorce, in order to support her.  Alimony, maintenance or spousal support all come hand in hand with the divorce as are the obligations instituted by divorce law in most of the countries based on the compulsion to support each other in the marriage. Further law supports this compulsion after the legal separation or may say after divorce. This alimony is ordered by the court in a case filed for divorce. Alimony can be modified as well with the changes in the needs of the former spouse, if those needs are allied to the former marriage relation. Awards and increases in alimony are meant to address only needs that are caused by the divorce itself, not unrelated needs. If the wifes elderly mother becomes ill and dependent on her after the divorce, however, a significant change in circumstances such as a rise in the recipients income or a drop in the payers income can cause the court to reduce or end alimony.For Expert consultation on Alimony Law you can, take advice from Alimony Lawyer or Alimony Attorney in your area.
What is Alimony?
Alimony is also sometimes called spousal support. Its designed to provide the Lower-Income spouse with money for living expenses over and above the money provided by child support. Alimony is different from child support. Where child support is a simple mathematical calculation using guidelines published by your state, alimony is very much in the discretion of the judge. Alimony is also called "spousal support". A considerable change in circumstance, such as illness, retirement, or loss of income, can be grounds for the court to grant a modification or termination of the payment. Failure to pay ordered alimony can result in contempt of court citations and even jail time. Alimony is completely different from child support.
The purpose of alimony : Alimony is to avoid any unfair economic consequences of a divorce, even after property is divided and child support, if any, is awarded. Courts set few specific guidelines to attaining this broad goal: instead of telling judges how and when to award alimony, most courts simply grant them broad discretion to decide what is fair in each case.
Why would I want to pay alimony?
Alimony gets treated differently from child support on your tax return. Alimony is tax deductible to the person who pays it, and included in the taxable income of the person who receives it. Child support, by contrast, is not taxable to the person who receives it and not tax deductible to the person who pays it. That means that when you and your spouse have dramatically different incomes, there may be some tax advantages to using alimony, even if a judge wouldnt ordinarily award it.

Popular Tags

Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

Above Information might be usefull for all the states in US & Canada as below;

Alabama(AL), Alberta(AB), Arizona(AZ), Arkansas(AR), British Columbia(BC), California(CA), Colorado(CO), Connecticut(CT), Delaware(DE), District of Columbia(DC), Florida(FL), Georgia(GA), Hawaii(HI), Idaho(ID), Illinois(IL), Indiana(IN), Iowa(IO), Kansas(KS), Kentucky(KY), Louisiana(LA), Maine(MN), Maryland(MD), Massachusetts(MA), Michigan(MI), Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada(NV), New Hampshire(NH), New Jersey(NJ), New Mexico(NM), New York(NY), North Carolina(NC), North Dakota(ND), Ohio(OH), Oklahoma(OK), Ontario(ON), Oregon(OR), Pennsylvania(PA), Rhode Island(RI), South Carolina(SC), South Dakota(SD), Tennessee(TN), Texas(TX), Utah(UT), Vermont(VT), Virginia(VA), Washington(WA), West Virginia(WV), Wisconsin(WI), Wyoming(WY)

Note: The information provided on LegalSuggest.com may be provided by third parties. The owners and operators of this site do not guarantee the correctness, completeness, and compliance of the content on this site. Such content is not and shall not be deemed tax, legal, financial, or other advice, so we encourage you to validate the accuracy of the content. Your use is at your own risk, and use of this site shall be deemed approval of the above.

vBulletin analytics